• An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow
  • An Image Slideshow

Recommended This Week

Black Tusk From Taylor Meadows - Squamish Snowshoeing

Madeley Lake Aerial Video - Squamish TrailsPanorama Ridge Aerial Video - Squamish TrailsLighthouse Park Aerial Video - Squamish Trails

Garibaldi Lake & Taylor Meadows Snowshoeing

Black Tusk far in the Distance from Taylor MeadowsGaribaldi Lake and Taylor Meadows is a beautiful trail to snowshoe in the winter in Garibaldi Park in Squamish.  Beautiful snowy meadows surrounded by mountains everywhere you look.  Black Tusk towering in the distance so close and blanketed in wonderful, beautiful snow.  You can snowshoe this route via Taylor Meadows on one way and by Garibaldi Lake on the return journey.  The Taylor Meadows/Garibaldi Lake trail forks partway up, left goes to Taylor Meadows, right to Garibaldi Lake (the trail joins again at the far side of both).

Garibaldi Lake, so massive and dramatically beautiful in the winter, a huge frozen valley.  The downside to this hike is the length of hiking to get to the beautiful parts.  In the summer it's not so bad as the trailhead is a moderately difficult 9k from Garibaldi Lake.  In the winter however, the trailhead parking lot is unplowed almost down to the highway.  So just to get to the summer trailhead requires about a 2k uphill snowshoe slog.

Taylor Meadows Boardwalk Buried in SnowIf you snowshoe the beautiful route to Taylor Meadows and return via Garibaldi Lake the route is 25 kilometres long and very strenuous as a one day snowshoe trip.  Camping at either Taylor Meadows or Garibaldi Lake are great options if you can stand the cold and are well prepared.  If you plan to do this trip in one day be sure to leave very early and be well prepared for winter hiking.  In the winter the days are very short so always have lights with you.  Although the trail will likely be tracked out by previous hikers and skiers, having a gps is an excellent backup in case you lose the trail.

If you are not troubled by a lot of exertion then it's a wonderful snowshoe destination.  Like Joffre Lakes it is frequented by skiers just enough to ensure an almost constant track throughout the winter so you can concentrate more on the scenery then keeping from getting lost.  Another nice attribute of this hike is the fact that you can snowshoe through the beautiful Taylor Meadows on the way up then across to Garibaldi Lake on the way back, therefore doing a little snowshoe circle route before heading back to your car at Rubble Creek.

Taylor Meadows Trail Signs Buried in Snow

Snowy Black Tusk from Taylor Meadows

Taylor Meadows Garibaldi Lake Snowshoe Map

Winter Parking Directions to Taylor Meadows

From Garibaldi Way(the last intersection before leaving Squamish, near Canadian Tire), heading North on Highway 99, toward Whistler. The well marked turnoff to Black Tusk(Garibaldi) trailhead is 32km on your right. As with all Garibaldi Park trails, dogs are not welcome.  The 2 kilometre road to the trailhead parking is not plowed in the winter so you will have to park at the end of this road.  Be sure not to block the road in any way however, as it is not unusual for huge 4x4's to drive up to the trailhead through the deep snow.

JavaScript must be enabled in order for you to use Google Maps.
However, it seems JavaScript is either disabled or not supported by your browser.
To view Google Maps, enable JavaScript by changing your browser options, and then try again.

More Squamish Snowshoe Trails

Elfin Lakes SnowshoeingElfin Lakes is a wonderfully accessible, skiing and snowshoeing paradise at the southern end of Garibaldi Park.  An amazing destination on its own, Elfin Lakes is also part of a gateway to so much more.  The Gargoyles, Little Diamond Head, Opal Cone...  There is a wonderful, extremely well equipped hut and campsites as well as a ranger station at the lakes. Staying at the amazing hut costs $15.  Elfin Lakes starts out ascending through deep forest, reaching the Red Heather Hut after Brandywine Falls Snowshoeing5k.  This is a small warming hut equipped with a wood stove complete with a stack of wood free to use.  Though sleeping here is for emergencies only, the Red Heather Hut is warm and welcoming.  The final 6k from this hut to Elfin Lakes takes you along a beautiful ridge with amazing views of snowy mountains all around.  The sheer distance of this snowshoeing trail ranks it as difficult.  Also, there is a considerable amount of elevation gain and loss along the way and you move through several gradual peaks and valleys.  Brandywine Falls Provincial Park, just a short, 25 minute drive north of Squamish is a nice and easy snowshoe trail in the winter.  Usually from December to March you will find the entrance gate to the park on the Sea to Sky Highway closed.  Some winters, you will see a mountain of snow, plowed from the highway on and adjacent to the gate.

Brandywine Falls Aerial Video

If you have snowshoes you can climb over this mountain of snow quite easily and make your way across the parking lot to the the trailhead and bridge.  The Sea to Sky Trail at Brandywine Falls is a fantastic snowshoeing route that leads to the Squamish Hiking - Bungee Bridge Snowshoeingamazing Whistler Bungee Bridge.  Just a 25 minute drive north of Squamish gets you to the parking and trailhead at the edge of the Sea to Sky Highway.  Snowshoeing from the parking lot (edge of highway in the winter) to Brandywine Falls is less than a kilometre and on a wide and flat trail.  Brandywine Falls drop an amazing 66 metres (216 feet) into the chasm far below Squamish Hiking - Train Wreckthat the viewing platform extends over.  Another trail extends past this viewing area leading to another, quieter area overlooking Daisy Lake.  This area is just a short, minute or two walk from the first viewing area.  During the winter months the parking lot gate to the large parking area is locked and buried in snow.  The snowplows make room for cars at the edge of the highway making Brandywine Falls, the Sea to Sky Trail, and the Cheakamus Bungee Bridge accessible year-round.  You can often hike to the falls on foot if the snow is hard enough, but most likely you will need snowshoes or skis between December and March.  This area is popular with cross country skiers and snowshoers in the winter.  Decades ago a train derailed south of Whistler.

Whistler Train Wreck Aerial Video

Over the next fifty years this wreckage has evolved into an absolutely amazing place to snowshoe, the Whistler Train Wreck.  The cost to clean up the wreckage was deemed too high, so seven train cars were left scattered next to the Cheakamus River.  As it turns out, time and local effort has transformed this mess into a wonderful work of art, an extraordinary bike park in the summer, and a great place to snowshoe in the winter.

Previous Squamish TrailsMore Squamish Trails

 

 

 

Squamish and Garibaldi Provincial Park Hiking TrailsSquamish Snowshoeing TrailsDriving Destinations from Squamish